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Cutting the Tubes Outer Tube: Part One
Inner Tube Outer Tube: Part Two
The Blades Seat Assembly
The Blades

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Cutting the Tubes
Okay, let's get started. We are going to prepare the outer tube first. Take your length of 1 1/4" PVC and cut a section off to a length of 22". Now print out two of these arm section templates and one of these center templates . When you have your three templates tape them to your PVC section, making sure to line up the central line in each section as well as the other alignment guide lines . Now take your metal drain tube . And place it next to the outer tube and mark where you will need to cut it . Be sure that the inner tube will extend far enough that the edges won't be seen through the top cut-out areas near the emitters, but also so that it doesn't extend so far that it comes out of the shroud itself . Using your mark as a guide, go ahead and cut the metal tube with your rotary tool . You might want to put a piece masking tape around the tube near your cut to help keep you from accidentally scratching the surface. The tube should end up being somewhere between 17" and 18". Once it's cut, set it aside. We'll come back to it later.
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The Outer Tube: Part One
With the templates still in place, go ahead and drill out all of the drill holes on the PVC tube . In the arm sections, you'll see that there is a drill hole on the bottom as well as the top. The bottom hole is for the belt clip knob. You only need to drill one of these, or if you want to forego the attachment system all together, you can drill no hole at all for knob. Once the holes are drilled, take your rotary tool and cut the PVC to the proper shape following the template . Don't worry about cleaning up your cuts right, now. We'll do that after will drill the metal tube. There are five holes to be drill that do not fall within the shaded portion of the template. Basically these are holes that will later accommodate rivets, but in sections where there will be no outer tube. Because we will later use the outer PVC tube as a drilling guide for the metal inner tube, we want to temporarily leave the PVC intact in these sections. So rather than completely cutting out the areas around these holes, just score the cut-lines into the PVC, so that you can complete the cut later once the template has been removed. Here is one such area in the upper central cut-outs and here in this bridge to accommodate the hole that will be used to secure the belt clip knob .
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The Inner Tube
Now we are going to use the PVC tube as a guide for the holes we need to drill in our metal tube. Before we do that, though there is a very optional step in preparing the metal tube, that I did on mine. I wanted to give the chrome plated tube a look more similar to that of machined aluminum. To do this I rigged up the end of my cordless drill so that it would fit snugly into the end of my metal tube . While I spun the tube on drill, I wrapped it with a piece of sandpaper that I ran slowly up the length of the pipe. I ended up with a nice machined looking finish. Just start with a fine grit sandpaper and be careful not to remove the chrome plating completely. Now back to the drilling. Take the metal tube and slide it into place within the rough cut PVC tube and secure it with some tape (I used some $1 spring clamps to hold mine in place) . Once you have the metal tube in place, use the drill holes in the PVC to drill holes into the metal tube beneath . Be sure to clean up those holes and make sure they'll accommodate your rivets.
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The Outer Tube: Part Two
Now finish trimming PVC tube. First go ahead and complete the cuts that you had only scored before so that you would have drilling guides. Take some sandpaper, files, and various grinding and cutting heads in your rotary tool and clean up all the edges on that PVC tube . To me this was the most tedious, time consuming and important step. It took me a couple days just to cut and trim the PVC. You don't want to rush yourself into a mistake here. Also, I recommend beveling the edges on the cuts slightly to avoid having sharp edges. Sharp edges tend to wear easily through paint or other coatings. Continue section by section until you get the PVC perfect . Once that's done you've finished the hard part. Now take the tube and wash it with soap and water to remove all the dirt and PVC dust. Once it's completely dry, take your spray PLASTIDIP and coat the PVC tube with it . I used about 2/3 of a can on this one tube, so don't be stingy with it. You want a lot of layers on this to stand up to being handled.
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The Blades Seat
Take your section of 3/4" PVC and cut a 3" length . Now take your two female adaptors and that 3" piece. These are going to make up your blade seating assembly. Set the PVC piece and the two adaptors in front of the metal tube to check the alignment of the holes . You want it spaced so that the outer ring of rivets will pass through the adapter and the PVC piece within it. When you are certain that the PVC length is correct, use a file or some sandpaper to scuff up the outer surface of the PVC ends and the inner surface of the female adapters. Then apply some of the Plastic Welder to the surfaces and seat the adapters onto the 3" PVC section . Be sure to read and follow the Plastic Welder directions for mixing and drying. Once it's ready to be handled, mark the center of your blade seat assembly . I used a strip of duct tape. This assembly is going to need to fit inside the metal tube. Check its fit now. You may need to slightly sand down the corners. I had to do this, just make sure you only take off what is necessary to get it into the tube. The tighter the better.
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Assembly
Now we are going to start putting the whole thing together. Take your finished outer tube and slide it (careful not to scratch off any of the coating) over the metal inner tube making sure the line up the holes . If for some strange reason the holes seem to be a little bit off, you may have the inner tube insert backward to the way it was when you drilled it. Now insert the blade seat assembly (with the center marked) into the saber. Use a section of 3/4" PVC to push it in until you can see your center mark through one of the center rivet holes . Now carefully drill through this hole into the blade seat assembly. Now place one the long (1/2") rivets into the hole . Before using your riveter to secure it, make yourself a rivet shield by folding over a piece of duct tape on itself and poking a hole through the center . Placing this on the rivet post while securing it will help keep you from scratching your saber when that rivet "pops" . Now repeat this process on the other 8 holes of the central section of the saber, using the long rivets each time . Now do the same for the two holes on the top side of the "arms" of the saber, only since there's no blade seat assembly underneath to be drilled, you will use the short (1/8") rivets here . This would be a good point to go swing it around in front the mirror. Does it look pretty cool? Good. Now there's more to be done. Take one of the buttons from your MVP belt clip system . Peel off the adhesive backing . Now drill a hole in the center and rivet it in place with a short rivet .
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The Blades
Okay, time to give your saber a little bite. Take your length of 3/4" PVC and cut a 40" section. Then take one of the barbed male threaded adapters . Scuff up the inside edge of the PVC and the outside of the barb of the adapter. Apply Plastic Welder to the scuffed surfaces and then insert the barb into the PVC . You made need the services of a hammer or mallet here. Then take one of your hose couplers . If it has a lot of bumps in the center section just grind them down with a sanding drum on the rotary tool. Place the coupler so that it's edge is 2 1/4" from the edge of the PVC . Wrap duct tape around the PVC until the coupler fits snugly over it. Test fit your blade into the saber by screwing it into the seat assembly. Don't worry if it's a little loose right now. Make sure the coupler doesn't stick out past the metal tube when it's in place. When you're happy with the placement of coupler drill a hole through it into the PVC below . Take a spherical grinding head in the rotary tool and recess the hole . Rivet the coupler in place with a long rivet . Repeat the process and now you've got two blades . If the fit of your blades is a little loose, simply apply some duct tape to the barbed sections of the couplers . Be carefully applying the tape. Apply the overlap so that it cannot unwind when you are UNscrewing the blade. If it does, it can foul against the tube and make it a real big pain to get out.
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Well I think you're done. How did it come out? Let me know.
-Brian.